Chinese Medicine Board of Australia

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Chinese Medicine Board of Australia
 

Guidelines for safe practice of Chinese herbal medicine

This FAQ relates to the Guidelines for safe practice of Chinese herbal medicine.

Labels, nomenclature & packaging

Yes. And you need to use the authorised pin yin as found in the Herbal Nomenclature Compendium of commonly used Chinese herbs, commissioned by the Board and published...

No, except when the scientific name is required to clarify potential ambiguity, or if you prefer to use this as well as the pin yin.

No, it must be accompanied by the pin yin name. Other members of the healthcare team, or the patient or carer, who do not understand Chinese characters, may need to know what herbs the patient is using.

No. Reporting adverse events is designed to improve quality assurance in healthcare. It is a public health safety system designed to identify unusual but important side effects. It is not used to penalise people who report it.

 

Dispensers & assistants

Yes. The dispenser has a duty and responsibility to ensure that the patient understands the preparation and administration instructions clearly. The dispenser must also be prepared to answer questions.

The registered Chinese herbal medicine practitioner or the registered Chinese herbal medicine dispenser who employs them.

 

No, this is not a standard form of Chinese medicine practice in Australia and is not taught in accredited Australian Chinese medicine programs.

 
 
 
 
Page reviewed 16/11/2015