Recency of practice

Recency of practice refers to how recently you have practised your profession, as well as the nature and extent of that practice.

In accordance with the National Law, the Board may decide that an individual is not a suitable person to hold general registration in the Chinese medicine profession if the nature, extent, period and recency of any previous practice of the profession is not sufficient to meet the Board's recency of practice registration standard.

When a practitioner renews their registration, they must also make a declaration that they have met the recency of practice requirements set out in the standard.

The standard applies to everyone applying for initial registration or renewal of registration. It does not apply to students or practitioners who have non-practising registration.

Practice means any role in which a Chinese medicine practitioner or Chinese herbal dispenser uses their skills in their profession in any way that impacts on safe, effective delivery of health services.

Practice hours are recognised if evidence is provided to demonstrate:

  • the role involved the application of Chinese medicine knowledge and skills, or
  • the time was spent undertaking postgraduate education leading to an award or qualification that is relevant to the practice of Chinese medicine, and
  • the person was registered if required to be so in order to practise.

All Chinese medicine practitioners will be required to make a declaration when they apply for registration and each year when they renew their registration that they have met the recency standard.

You do not need to provide any records at this time. You only need to produce records to support this declaration if you are selected through the Board's random audit process.

The Board's recency of practice registration standard outlines the scope, requirements and re-entry arrangements for practitioners who have been absent from practice.

In accordance with the National Law, the Board may decide that an individual is not a suitable person to hold general registration if the nature, extent, period and recency of any previous practice of the profession is not sufficient to meet the requirements specified in an approved registration standard relevant to the profession (section 55 of the National Law).

When a practitioner renews their registration, they must make a declaration that they meet recency of practice requirements set by the Board (section 109 of the National Law).

When deciding on a response, practitioners are expected to ask themselves the following questions:

  • Have I practised at all in the last 3 years and is it enough to maintain competence?
  • What is my current level of knowledge and skills and how do I know?
  • Have I participated in regular continuing professional development?
  • What have I done to prepare to return to practice?
  • Have I done more study during the period of absence?

Practitioners exempt from meeting the requirements of this standard include:

  • recent graduates who apply for registration within 2 years of graduation
  • practitioners who have undergone and passed an approved formal competency assessment as determined by the Board within the previous 3 years (for example practitioners who have sat registration examinations); and
  • practitioners applying for or renewing non-practising registration.

Yes, however, you need to provide the same level of evidence on request as required for practice undertaken in Australia.

A practitioner who has not practised for three or more years is required to submit a proposal for re-entry to professional practice.

Failure to comply with this standard is a breach of the legal requirements for registration and may constitute behaviour for which health, conduct or performance action may be taken.

If a registrant is unable to make the required declaration of compliance at annual renewal the Board may refuse to renew their registration or any endorsement of registration, or may grant renewal of registration or endorsement of registration subject to conditions.

Knowingly making a false declaration will be considered by the Board to be a professional conduct matter and as such, may be dealt with by the Board through disciplinary mechanisms available under the National Law.

Yes. If you are selected for auditing you will be required to produce evidence that your declaration on renewal was truthful.

No, you only need to sign a declaration to say that you meet the recency of practice registration standard. Evidence will only be requested if you are selected for audit.

  • Schedule 1 relates to PRACTICE evidence; and
  • Schedule 2 relates to COMPETENCE evidence.

All copies must be de-identified, certified copies of real patient records.

For practice evidence, we are seeking proof that you practice. The record must show that you do either acupuncture, or Chinese herbal medicine or both, depending on what you are applying for.

For competence evidence we are seeking proof that you are competent. We will look for evidence in the records of whether you:

  • are practising acupuncture and/or Chinese herbal medicine;
  • have the knowledge and application of Chinese medicine differential diagnosis; and/or
  • design treatments specific to the person's condition.

For acupuncture the evidence must demonstrate design and use of individualised acupuncture treatment plans and effective use of the treatment techniques.

For Chinese herbal medicine the evidence must demonstrate design and use of individualised Chinese herbal medicine prescriptions.

 
 
 
Page reviewed 24/09/2013